COVID-19 Response

How to Protect Yourself When Going Out

How do I get vaccinated?


Option 1: Register online at GetTheVaccine.dshs.texas.gov.

You will be notified by email or text when and where to get the vaccine.

If there’s not an available clinic near you, you will be directed to other places to get your vaccine.



Option 2: Check the COVID‑19 Vaccination Hub Providers page to find a hub near you and learn how to register.

Remember, vaccine supply is still limited in Texas, even though more arrives each week.



Option 3: Check Vaccine Finder to search for available vaccines by zip code.

Check early in the morning for wider availability.



Option 4: Use the Texas COVID‑19 Vaccine Availability map to find a provider near you with the vaccine available.

Check the provider’s website or call to find out how to sign up. Local providers like pharmacies may have vaccines available.



Option 5: Try scheduling your appointment online directly at a local pharmacy.


CVS Pharmacies

Check here for availability.


HEB Pharmacies

Check here for availability.


Kroger Pharmacies

Check here for availability.


Tom Thumb Pharmacies

Check here for availability.


Walmart Pharmacies

Check here for availability.


Tip: Try scheduling your appointment between 5-6 am to find a pharmacy near you.


If you don't have internet or need help signing up:

Call the Texas Department of Help Vaccination Helpline: (833) 832-7067

Call center support is available 7am-7pm, 7 days a week.

Spanish language and other translators are available to help callers.

Why should I get vaccinated?

COVID-19 vaccination will help keep you from getting COVID-19

  • All COVID-19 vaccines currently available in the United States have been shown to be highly effective at preventing COVID-19. Learn more about the different COVID-19 vaccines.

  • All COVID-19 vaccines that are in development are being carefully evaluated in clinical trials and will be authorized or approved only if they make it substantially less likely you’ll get COVID-19. Learn more about how federal partners are ensuring COVID-19 vaccines work.

  • Based on what we know about vaccines for other diseases and early data from clinical trials, experts believe that getting a COVID-19 vaccine may also help keep you from getting seriously ill even if you do get COVID-19.

  • Getting vaccinated yourself may also protect people around you, particularly people at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

  • Experts continue to conduct more studies about the effect of COVID-19 vaccination on severity of illness from COVID-19, as well as its ability to keep people from spreading the virus that causes COVID-19.

COVID-19 vaccination is a safer way to help build protection

  • COVID-19 can have serious, life-threatening complications, and there is no way to know how COVID-19 will affect you. And if you get sick, you could spread the disease to friends, family, and others around you.

  • Clinical trials of all vaccines must first show they are safe and effective before any vaccine can be authorized or approved for use, including COVID-19 vaccines. The known and potential benefits of a COVID-19 vaccine must outweigh the known and potential risks of the vaccine for use under what is known as an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA). Watch a video on what an EUA is.

  • Getting COVID-19 may offer some natural protection, known as immunity. Current evidence suggests that reinfection with the virus that causes COVID-19 is uncommon in the 90 days after initial infection. However, experts don’t know for sure how long this protection lasts, and the risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19 far outweighs any benefits of natural immunity. COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you by creating an antibody (immune system) response without having to experience sickness.

  • Both natural immunity and immunity produced by a vaccine are important parts of COVID-19 disease that experts are trying to learn more about, and CDC will keep the public informed as new evidence becomes available.

COVID-19 vaccination will be an important tool to help stop the pandemic

  • Wearing masks and social distancing help reduce your chance of being exposed to the virus or spreading it to others, but these measures are not enough. Vaccines will work with your immune system so it will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed.

  • The combination of getting vaccinated and following CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19.

  • Stopping a pandemic requires using all the tools we have available. As experts learn more about how COVID-19 vaccination may help reduce spread of the disease in communities, CDC will continue to update the recommendations to protect communities using the latest science.


Side Effects & Allergic Reactions

Mild side effects are normal signs your body is building protection, and they usually go away after a few days. The chance of a severe reaction is less than 0.5%. To be safe, your provider will have you wait on-site for 15-30 minutes after your shot.

V-safe: Register with CDC's V-safe After Vaccination Health Checker on your smartphone to report any side effects after getting the COVID-19 vaccine. You’ll also get reminders for your second vaccine dose.